Chaplain William Dewitt Clinton Rodrock’s Civil War Letters and Reports (47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1865)

Editor’s Note: Additional letters and reports penned by the Rev. William Dewitt Clinton Rodrock during his time as chaplain with the 47th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry are available, and will be added to this section as time permits. Please enjoy the sampling of his letters below, and check back frequently for updates.

 

Camp Fairview (near Charlestown), Virginia, 31 January 1865
(report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Camp Fairview.
Two miles from Charlestown, Va
January 31st, 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir.

I have the honor respectfully, to submit the following report for the present month.

Although God is not in men’s thoughts; his law being violated with impunity and his authority contemned “at will”; yet as a nation, our God is the Lord. The mind rest with pleasure on the abounding proof of this great fact. The history of the past, how full of it!

From the first planting of our Fathers on this soil, onward to this day, the true God has been claimed as ours. The foundations of our government were laid in the full and firm apprehension and acknowledgment of this fact. There is one scene recorded in our history which more than all others prove this; we have it commemorated in the engraving of the First Prayer in Congress.

There were the sages and patriots of our land – the representations of the whole country. They had reached a most critical point in their deliberations. They felt the need of higher wisdom than their own. They call in the minister of God, the servant of Jesus Christ; and there and then, in most affecting, service, our country – our whole country is laid at the foot of the Divine throne.

If ever there was heartfelt acknowledgment of a living and true God, and most hearty and sincere invocation of his favor, it was there. For themselves, for their living countrymen, for those to come after them, they cast their all on God, and bound themslves and all to him! Most touching and ever-memorable scene! Worthy the occasion and worthy of a great nation. In this spirit the Christian and the patriot, whether in civic or military life strive to labor, and should fire all hearts and nerve all arms in our present fiery struggle for universal freedom.

I am happy to report the favorable and healthy condition of the Reg. Our aggregate is 891. Of these 19 are transiently on the sick list. No deaths have occurred during the month.

We employ all available means for promoting the temporal and spiritual welfare of the command.

Having a large library of select books, I am prepared to meet the wants of the men in this direction.

Besides I distribute several hundred religious papers among them every week. I am convinced, by experience, that this is one of the effectual and welcome means of gaining the attention of the mass of the men to religious truth, and keeping up the tie between them and the Church at home.

Ever striving to labor with an eye single to the glory of God and our country.

I have the honor,
Gen’l to remain
Your Obed’t Servant

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. P.V.V.
2nd Brig. 1st Div. 19th Corps

 

Camp Fairview (near Charlestown), Virginia, 28 February 1865
(report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Camp Fairview
Near Charlestown, Va
Feb. 28th 1865

Brig. Gen. L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l U.S. Army

Sir.

I have the honor herewith, to present my report for the month of February.

That blessed peace whose type and emblem is our holy Gospel it is as yet not ours to enjoy. The stern alarums of war still resound in the ears of the nation. And as our victorious columns are marching on, they are sounding the death-knell of the so called Southern Confederacy.

In the strange system and series of paradoxes which make up human life, it often happens that the very disciples of “good will” and brotherly love must buckle on the harness of war. Such emphatically is the case in our present contest. Nor should it be otherwise.

Even our Saviour [sic] came not to bring peace, but a sword until the right should triumph and the sword be beat to a ploughshare. And as our present struggle involves on our side, all that is worthy living for and all that is worth dying for, it may very well fire all hearts and nerve all arms in its behalf.

The Flag which Hernando Cortes carried in that most extraordinary of expeditions in Mexico had for its device, flames of fire on a white and blue ground, with a red cross in the midst of the blaze, and the following words on the borders as a motto,”Amici, Crucem sequamur, et in hoc signo vincemur!” Friends, let us follow the cross, and, trusting in that emblem we shall conquer!”

In these more enlightened times, with more intelligent soldiers, with a purer Church at our back, and with a holier cause, we will keep the motto of Cortes steadily before our eyes; and in personal as in national experience, we shall turn the war into a blessing to the country and to humanity.

It gives me great pleasure to report the improved condition and general good health of the Reg. A large influx of recruits has materially increased our numbers; making our present aggregate 954 men, including 35 commissioned officers.

The number of sick in the Reg. is 22; all of which are transient cases, and no deaths have occurred during the month.

Whilst in a moral and religious point of view there is still a wide margin for amendment and improvement; it is nevertheless gratifying to state that all practicable and available means are employed for the promotion of the spiritual and physical welfare of the command.

And in this connection, I desire to mention our indebtedness to the U.S. Christian Commission for furnishing us with a large supply of excellent reading matter and such delicacies as are highly useful for the Hospital.

That God is in this war of rebellion, that he has brought it upon us, that He over rules it, that its issues are in his hand, that he intends to teach us and the whole world some of the greatest and most sublime lessons ever taught in his providential dealings since the world began, is becoming more and more manifest.

To Him, we will ascribe all Honor and Glory, now and forever.

I have the honor, Gen’l, to remain
Respectfully, Your Obed’t Servant.

W. D. C. Rodrock,
Chaplain, 47th Reg. P.V.V.
2nd Brig. 1st Division, 19th A.C.

 

Camp Fairview (near Charlestown), Virginia, 31 March 1865
(cover letter, letter, and report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Camp Fairview.
Near Charlestown, Va.
March 31st/65

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l U.S. Army

Sir.

I have the honor herewith, to transmit my report for the present month.

Very Respectfully Yours,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. P. Vols

 

Camp Fairview
Two Miles from Charlestown, Va.
March 5th/65

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen., U.S. Army

Sir.

I hereby enclose my report for Feb. It having been returned from Brig. Hd. Qrts, to be forwarded direct. In accordance with Gen’l  Orders No 158, dated Apl. 13th 1864, I hitherto forwarded my reports through the “usual military channels”. Why I am now ordered to forward direct, is not clear to my mind. Would you have the kindness to forward me any orders issued since the one of the above date & bearing on the duties of Chaplains etc.

If any have been issued, I never recd [sic] them.

I have the honor, Gen’l
To remain, respectfully,
Your Obed’t Servant

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chap. 47th Reg. P.V.V.
2nd Brig. 1st Div. 19th Corps
Washington, D.C.

 

Camp Fairview, Va.
March 31st 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir.

Admist the general glory and success attending our arms on land and sea, it is my pleasant duty to report also the favorable and improved condition of our Reg. for the present month.

In a military sense it has greatly improved in efficiency and strength. By daily drill and a constant accession of recruits, these desirable objects have been attained. The entire strength of the Reg. rank and file is now 1019 men.

Its sanitary condition is all that can be desired. But 26 are on the sick list, and these are only transient cases. We have now our full number of Surgeons, – all efficient and and faithful officers.

We have lost none by natural death. Two of our men were wounded by guerillas, while on duty at their Post. From the effects of which one died on the same day of the sad occurrence. He was buried yesterday with appropriate ceremonies. All honor to the heroic dead.

In a moral and religious point of view, we can never attain too great a proficiency. And in our Reg. like in all others, the vices incident to army life prevail to a considerable extent, whatever means may be employed for their restraint.

Still it affords me pleasure to state, that every possible facility is extended the men for moral and religious culture. Divine services are held whenever practicable, and a good supply of moral and religious reading matter, in the form of books and papers, is furnished to the command.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost; as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end.

I have the honor, Gen’l
To remain, Respectfully
Your Obed’t. Servant.

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. P.V. Vols

 

Camp (near Fort Stevens), Washington, D.C. 30 April 1865
(report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Camp, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Near Fort Stevens, D.C.
April 30th 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas,
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir.

The present month claims more than an ordinary place in our National history. In the very hour of general exultation and rejoicing for vouchsafed blessings and victories on our arms, promising speedy restoration of internal peace and return of prosperity and happiness, our great and good Chief Magistrate, Abraham Lincoln, was slain by the hand of foul conspiracy and vile assassination. For the first time the annals of the country have been stained by a political assassination! It is a crime against God, against the Nation, against humanity and against liberty, that has thus been perpetrated! It is the madness of Treason and murder! And the day that commemorates the Crucifixion of the Saviour [sic] of Man is henceforth made forever memorable by a new crime against the Law of God and the Country.

But we must bow low, before the Almighty Hand that thus shows us the weakness and wickedness of man and the vanity of all human calculations!

May this fearful blow recall us all to our duties! We will draw near to the Altar of our country, also, as we approach the Altar of our God. We have great duties in this crisis. And the first is to forget selfishness and passion and party, and look to the salvation of the Country.

As to our lamented President, let us do justice to his memory! He dies in the hour of his country’s restored greatness, and in the full fruition of his own personal triump. The assassin’s blow, will rank him in the memory of mankind among the martyrs of freedom.

The 19th inst. – the day set apart for the funeral of our late President, was duly observed with appropriate ceremonies for our Brigade. The Regiments present were the 47th Pa. V. V.’s, 8th Vermont, 12th Conn. and 153rd N. Y. It became my duty to officiate on the occasion, and it was one of the most solemn and impressive scenes I ever witnessed.

The general condition of our Reg. is good and encouraging.

During the greater part of the month, we have been more or less on the move in Shenandoah Valley. This interfered materially with our ordinary religious services. Still it is my earnest effort, to afford every possible facility and privelege [sic] for the spiritual advancement of the command. Holding divine services whenever practicable and furnishing the men with moral and religious reading.

Our present aggregate is 1020 men. 38 Officers and 983 men.

The health of the Reg. continues remarkably good. The number of sick and wounded for the present month sums up 22. Of these 13 have been returned to duty, leaving but 9 today.

In the Reg. proper there have been no deaths. We have received intelligences, however, that sevveral of our men, captured in the Battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19th/64, died in rebel prisons.

We have abundant means to thank God for the blessings vouchsafed to us, and it becomes us to show forth His praise, by giving up ourselves to His service. Making His glory our aim, and His will our rule in all our councils and duties.

I have the honor, General,
To remain, Very Respectfully,
Your Obed’t. Servant.

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. P.V. Vol’s
2nd Brig. 1st Division,
Army of Shenandoah.

 

Camp Brightwood, Washington, D.C., 31 May 1865
(cover letter and report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Camp Brightwood, D.C.
May 31st 1865

Brig. General L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l U.S. Army

Sir

I have the honor, herewith to transmit my report for the present month.

I am, sir, Very Respectfully,
Your obedient servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. P.V.V.

 

Camp Brightwood, D.C.
May 31st 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir.

The wise king of the Scriptures speaks of a sorrow that pervades the human heart, “in the midst of laughter.” The truthfulness of this Divine philosophy is matter of daily experience. Our most joyous seasons are intermingled with a sadness that often challenges definition. Every garden has its sepulchre [sic]. Every draught of sweet has its ingredient of bitter. This fact has never been so fully realized as during this month. With the mighty army of brave soldiers congregated and reviewed in Washington, and the superadded hosts from civil life, expressions of deep regret, that Abraham Lincoln is not here to have witnessed the great pageant of the 23rd and 24th inst. have been universal. Not the splendid victories which our brave soldiers have won – not the pleasing prospect that they are “homeward bound” – not the consolatory thought that the reins of government have fallen into the hands of so good a man as Andrew Johnson – have served to restrain these utterances of grief and sorrow. Had it been God’s will to spare Mr. Lincoln’s life, what an eclat his presence would have imparted to the mighty pageant!

But as He willed otherwise and ‘doeth all things well,’ it is ours to learn the great lesson of the hour. It affords me great pleasure to report the good condition and discipline of the Reg. for the present month. Now, that the war is virtually over, our strength is gradually lessened by the discharge of disabled men and those whose terms of enlistment is about expiring.

Our aggregate strength is now 1005 men – rank and file. During the month 15 men have been discharged, on the sick list, and 3 died in General Hospital. In the Reg. proper no deaths have occurred.

All possible facilities are provided for moral and religious improvement in the command.

Literary, moral and religious books and papers I keep constantly on hand, to meet the wants of the Reg.

Divine services are regularly held on all proper occasions, unless unavoidably interfered with.

Praying with all my heart that the good work of pacification may go bravely on until the National authority with all its benign influence shall be extended over every part of our beloved country.

I am, Sir, Very Respectfully,
Your obedient servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock,
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
2nd Brig. Dwight’s Division.

 

Headquarters, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Savannah, Georgia, 30 June 1865
(cover letter and report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Savannah, Ga.
June 30th 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir

I have the honor, herewith to transmit my report for the month of June.

Very Respectfully,
Your Obed’nt Servant

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols

 

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Savannah, Ga.
June 30th 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas,
Adj. Gen’l U.S. Army

Sir

Faith in a Providence is natural to the human soul, and, indeed indestructable. It gives inspiration to all songs of hope, inflames the imaginations of Prophets, imparts a charm to Philosophy, exalts patriotism above the fear of suffering, and fills the eye of religion with a light that brightens like the dawn as it discerns the advent of the coming day.

Banish, the thought, the conception, or the faith which men in some sort cherish, that God worketh in all and through all for the consumation [sic] of his holy purposes, and time at once becomes a sepulchre [sic]! If riotous passions, vengeful prejudices, base animosities, low ambitions, and Satanic selfishness are the chief factors in the problem of human destiny, then what else is this world than a wandering Hell. But God makes his presence and power known; and oftentimes in tones of such terrible majesty as causes the nations to quake before him.

The great struggle through which we have just passed is now over. The passions which begot it have nearly subsided. But the material forces which have met in arms, great as they have been in their sheer weightiness were as nothing when compared with the moral forces which they represented. We find our interest not so much in contemplating the tremendous display of heroic valor, which on either side has dazzled and awed the wondering world, as we do in estimating the civil and religious principles assailed and defended. The morality of a war is its sole excuse, and gives it all its dignity.

The sword is the horrid type of the utmost wickedness; and therefore Christian nations can only engage in a war, which is in some shape a defensive one. All nations who [sic] have seized the sword to gratify the lust of dominion or the greed of personal ambition, have perished by the sword. Peoples who have delighted in war, have all, sooner or later, fallen under its crushing and ruthless violence. Ours has been a conflict between brethren, fatal indeed, in many ways, but still crowned with great and glorious results for all, North, South, East and West. Viewed in its widest horizen [sic], this terrible civil war of the past four years reaches its triumphant close freighted with promises of immeasurable good to freedom and humanity. We have baptized anew the altars of freedom with our blood, and as a result of the war, behold a nation, living, teaching, and preaching the glorious doctrine on which it is founded, that all men were created equal, and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

It gives me renewed pleasure, to report the encouraging condition and general good health of the Reg. Notwithstanding our transition into a more Southern climate, since the beginning of this month, our list of sick is small.

The present aggregate of the Reg. is 861. Rank and file. On the sick list there are but 16 transient cases. No deaths have occurred during the month.

For all this I am truly grateful to the great Author of all good.

Ever laboring for the promotion of the temporal and spiritual welfare of the command, and with an eye single to the glory of God. –

I am, Gen’l, Very Respectfully
Your obedient servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
3rd Brig. Dwight’s Division

 

Headquarters, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Charleston, South Carolina, 31 July 1865
(report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
July 31st 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir

In our age of breathless progress, great events jostle each other for the priority. And war and peace, prosperity and calamity, crises in politics, finance or social experiment, follow each other with the quick flash of the ever varying scenes in a kaleidoscope. It is difficult to imagine the posture of the nation a single year ago, or to realize how, already the achievements of the war are gathering the dust of history.

Already, too, we are counting up the cost of the late war.

And speaking reverently, and feeling all the weight of suffering it brought forth; mindful of the negligence, cowardice, and lack of patriotism in which it was fostered at the North, and the ambition, cruel selfishness, and accursed treachery, which nurtured it at the South; bating no jot from the amazing total of life and treasure which were spent in its prosecution, by every state, from California to Florida, and the desolation which scores of years cannot wholly hide under the mantle of present prosperty; – Yet after all, the loyal People of the Union, beginning with those saintly sufferers whose first sharp pangs of the loss of loved ones have been soothed by the lapse of time and reflection, will pronounce the war to have been “for the best.”

The Nation, devoutly grateful to God, seems now to regard this terrible four years scourge as an instrument of His choice for our education and improvement.

Since my report of the previous month, our command was transferred from Savannah to this Post, And, with gratitude to the “Giver of every good and perfect gift,” it is my pleasure to report the health of the Reg. as good, and the general condition as satisfactory. Our number, however, is gradually diminishing through the mustering out of those whose time is expiring, and a few desertions.

Our aggregate is 816 – Officers and men. The list of sick foots up 35. All of which are transient cases. I regret to state, that two of our comrades died, while detached on duty. Peace to their ashes and rest to their souls.

Every facility for spiritual and moral improvement is accorded to the men. And the only poignant regret I entertain is, that all do not equally strive to win the prize of the soul’s greatest and best interest.

Looking to God for guidance, in all my labors, and invoking His blessing upon our command – the Nation and the world at large. –

I am, Gen’l, Very Respectfully,
Your Obedient Servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols

 

Headquarters, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Charleston, South Carolina, 31 August 1865
(cover letter and report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Head Quart’rs, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
Aug. 31st 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir

I have the honor, herewith, to transmit my Report for the present month.

Very Respectfully,
Your Obed’t. Servant

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. P.V.V.

 

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
Aug. 31st 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l, U.S. Army

Sir

The great sentiment which should now move and pervade every heart is that of profound gratitude to Almighty God for the solution of a problem of world-wide significance involved in our recent struggle.

The mad discord and rage of battle gives place to the holy melodies of love and peace. The settlement of certain questions, however, growing out of the contest will test the capacity and statesmanship of  our wisest and best men, to the uttermost [sic]. But the God of our Fathers, who has been with us in all the past, will not forsake us in the present emergency. His interposition on our behalf has been of such a character for the last four years that only an atheistic fool can fail to regard it. Whether we consider the war in its conduct, or in the manner of its close, we feel constrained to say:– ‘This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvellous [sic] in our eyes!”

It is now a time for good and patriotic men of all sections and parties to united in saying: “This is the day which the Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad.”

That the long, fierce, terrible war is done; that victory crowns our banners; that slavery has been swept from the land; that happy hearth-stones and every thing [sic] that adorns civilized life will take the place of war’s rude desolations, are now among the crowning glories in our National diadem.

It is still my good pleasure to report the favorable condition of our Regiment. All things considered the health continues remarkably good. And taking into account the fact that the war is over, and the men anxious to go home, the morale and discipline is also encouraging.

Religious services are held every sabbath [sic], and the privelege [sic] for attendance is extended to all. Our aggregate sums up 806. Of which 36 are commissioned officers. The number sick in Hospital is 37. The Surgeon regards them all as transient cases.

It is our sad lot to record the death of three of our comrades for the present month. They were buried with the honors of war and appropriate religious services.

Deeply grateful to God for all his past mercies and trusting Him for guidance in that which is to come:–

I am, Gen’l, Very Respectfully,
Your obedient servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chapl’n, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols

 

Headquarters, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Charleston, South Carolina, 30 November 1865
(cover letter and report to Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript:

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
Nov. 30th 1865

Brig. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Genl. U.S. Army

Sir

I have the honor, herewith to transmit my report for the month of November.

I have the honor, Genl,
To remain, Very Respectfully
Your Obed. Servant,

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chap. 47th Reg. P.V.V.

 

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols.
Charleston, S.C.
Nov. 30th 1865

Brig. Genl. L. Thomas,
Adj. Genl. U.S. Army

Sir

For the present month, I respectfully beg leave to report as follows.

Having discharged the duties of Post Chaplain for some time past, in connection with my duties in the Reg., my labors have been materially increased.

I hold religious services in Post Hospital every sabbath [sic] and daily administer to the spiritual wants of our sick.

I have taken great pains to supply both the Hospital and Reg. with proper moral and religious books and papers. These have proved to be very profitable and useful.

Our Divine services are well attended and an encouraging interest manifested in them. Though it is always to be regretted and lamented that so many lose sight of their soul’s eternal interest and wilfully neglect the means of grace.

The general health of the Reg. is good. There are but 19 on the sick list, and these are all transient cases.

The aggregate strength of the Reg. now is 720 men. No deaths during the month have occurred.

Looking to God for counsel and direction in all my labors.

I am, General, Very Respectfully Yours

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. V.V.

 

Headquarters, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Charleston, South Carolina, 31 December 1865
(cover letter and report to Brevet-Major L. Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army)

Head Quarters, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
Dec. 31st 1865

Brev. Maj. Gen. L. Thomas
Adj. Gen. U.S. Army

Sir

I have the honor herewith to transmit my report for the month of December.

I have the honor, Gen’l
To remain, Very Respectfully
Your Obed. Servant

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. V.V.

 

Head Quarters, 47th Pa. Vet. Vols
Charleston, S.C.
Dec. 31st 1865

Brev. Maj. Gen’l L. Thomas
Adj. Gen’l U.S. Army

Sir

I respectfully beg leave to report that during the present month, I have held divine services every sabbath [sic], and during the week administered to the sick in Hospital.

The sanitary condition of the Reg. is good.

There are but a few on the sick list and these are only transient cases.

I fervently wish that I could report thus favorably of our moral and religious condition.

With all the facilities afforded and all the opportunities extended men will ignore their religious duties and recklessly plunge into sin and wickedness.

It becomes my sad duty to note the death of our of our number. He was buried with appropriate religious services and military honors.

The aggregate strength of the Reg. is 710.

This number comprises 36 commissioned officers and 674 enlisted men.

As the Reg. is under orders to be mustered out and our muster out rolls are completed, we expect to embark for Penn’a in a few days.

Hence, I may safely presume that this will be my final report as Chaplain of this Reg.

Invoking the blessing of the Triune God, upon our command, the country and the world.

I am, Gen’l, Very Respectfully Yours

W. D. C. Rodrock
Chaplain, 47th Reg. Pa. Vet. Vols

Address, –
Fayetteville,
Franklin Co.
Penn’a

 

 

Sources:

Reports and Other Correspondence of W. D. C. Rodrock, Chaplain, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (Record Groups R91, R171, R283, R327, R460, R555, R756, R796, R951, R1007). Washington, D.C.: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, 1865.

 

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